Conference Posters

2015 June

Initiates file download What do we learn from automated plant phenotyping?

alt Digital Phenotyping and Image Analysis 1st General COST FA1306 Meetingat IPK Gatersleben

Marcus Jansen


Phenotyping platform

Substantial progress in automated and non-invasive plant phenotyping technology during the recent two decades

Various platforms developed at academic institutes and by commercial providers

Operational and valuable tools in plant science and breeding

Multiple publications prove large advances in basic and applied scienceLaserscanning is a powerful tool for monitoring plants in high resolution and can be used in laboratory for single plants as well as on field scale.



2015 March

Initiates file download High throughput 3D plant analysis precise inspection on organ and field scale

alt Digital Phenotyping and Image Analysis Workshop on Laser Scanning Applications, University of Cologne, Germany

Stefan Paulus; Marcus Jansen, Ben Niehaus 



High throughput 3D plant analysis precise inspection on organ and field scaleLaserscanning is a powerful tool for monitoring plants in high resolution and can be used in laboratory for single plants as well as on field scale. • Organ-based parameters can be observed such as leaf area, elongation or leaf movement on laboratory scale. • 3D Imaging on field scale enables the generation of height maps or-in case of different scans over time-the generation of growths maps.







2015 March

Initiates file download Plant organ phenotyping enables analysing developmental processes and diurnal changes

alt Digital Phenotyping and Image Analysis Plant Organ Growth Symposium, Ghent, Belgium

Marcus Jansen, Tino Dornbusch, Stefan Paulus


Plant organ phenotyping enables analysing developmental processes and diurnal changes
Automated non-invasive measurements of plant organ size, colour, shape, and physiological properties as well as their change in time are of high relevance for plant science. Developing organs mainly contribute to plant growth, but organ growth is necessary for recovery after damage events, too. Together with molecular and biochemical data, phenotypic studies of plants and their composing organs give insight into developmental processes and responses to environmental factors. In particular laser-scanning and sophisticated analyses of RGB images allow measuring single organs such as leaves, flowers, fruits, or roots as parts of total plants. Co-registration of organ location data together with values derived from sensors such as NIR, fluorescence, or hyperspectral cameras, physiological data can be mapped to particular organs.

A technical case study demonstrated use of an RGB camera in a LemnaTec Scanalyzer3D together with LemnaGrid software for measuring and analyising size and shape of individual maize (Zea mays) leaves. Time dependent development of organs was monitored and angles between leaves could be determined. Recent research analysed diurnal regulation of leaf growth and leaf angles in Arabidopsis thaliana using a laser scanner in a ScanalzyerHTS instrument. Phenotypic data provided important insight in diurnal and light dependent developmental processes.

2015 January

Initiates file download Automated analysis of disease symptoms using LemnaTec ScanalyzerHTS

alt Digital Phenotyping and Image Analysis Plant and Animal Genome 2015, San Diego, Ca, USA // alt Digital Phenotyping and Image AnalysisPhytotron Conference 2014

Marcus Jansen, Tino Dornbusch


Automated analysis of disease symptoms using LemnaTec ScanalyzerHTS
Automated non-invasive phenotyping procedures have been established as valuable tools in plant science and breeding. Beyond measuring traits related to growth and/or architecture of plants, the analysis of foliar diseases increasingly gains importance in phenotyping. Image-based phenotypic studies on disease development have highlighted the potential to monitor and understand plant-pathogen interactions. This generates valuable knowledge both for basic and applied science with the aim to breed for resistant cultivars. 

In a first case study we quantified foliar diseases on sugar beets, an important crop in central Europe. Beets are threatened by foliar diseases such as Cercospora beticola, Ramularia beticola, or Uromyces betae. We collected samples of diseased sugar beet leaves from a field trial at the Julius Kühn Institute in Elsdorf, Germany. Leaf discs of healthy and infected tissue were imaged in the ScanalyzerHTS. Images were acquired with a Basler camera (pilot piA2400-17gc) using background illumination and analysed using LemnaGrid software. Image analysis yielded the relative infected leaf area, the number of detected disease symptoms, and their size distribution. Shape and colour parameters of symptoms were specific for the different diseases and enabled discrimination between them.

In a second case study we analysed Diplocarpon rosae leaf spots on roses, one of the most important ornamental plants worldwide. Image acquisition and analysis of healthy and diseased leaves was carried out as using the same imaging and analysis setup. Disease severity as percentage of infected leaf area could be derived from image analysis.

Both case studies demonstrate how automated phenotyping technology allows quantifying plant diseases. Versatility of image acquisition and analysis technology makes the approach suitable for analysing further plant-disease combinations.